Coastal Protection

1976 was a watershed year for West Marin’s priceless coastal resources – the California Coastal Act was passed into law, implementing the coastal initiative passed by voters in 1972, and Congress passed the Point Reyes Wilderness Act, which designated over 33,000 acres of the National Seashore as wilderness, thereby securing its protection under the 1964 Wilderness Act. EAC is the only organization working to honor the intent and mandates of both laws – to ensure full wilderness status for the West Coast’s only Congressionally designated marine wilderness area at Drakes Estero, and ensure that Marin County’s Local Coastal Program Amendment does not weaken existing coastal resource protections. Both matters have significant legal, policy, and scientific details to analyze and consider, and EAC has remained continuously engaged to uphold West Marin’s environmental integrity.

Summary of EAC’s Outstanding Concerns in Revised Draft IP:

Marin’s Coastal Zone depends on all of us to protect and defend it! EAC has reviewed the 251-page revised draft coastal Implementation Plan and is working to ensure our coastal regulations remain strong!

Review Marin LCP CCC edits sent to the county here

  • Continued deletion of public’s longstanding right of appeal to Commission for important CDP decisions imposes a significant public risk, detriment given county’s history of erroneous decisions. It also denies the public’s right under the Coastal Act to participate in the planning process.
  • Commission staff treatment of PPU for C-APZ runs counter to Commission’s LCP Guidance Document
  • Deletion of Design Review would eliminate important public hearings
  • Limits to ESHA Buffer encroachments are still needed
  • Grading plan threshold trigger and maximum slope limit are missing
  • Well provisions are a good start but incomplete; standards needed for both new and expanded wells.
  • Farmworker housing allowance completely unrestrained and unguided
  • Mariculture support facilities must be limited to bivalves grown in Tomales Bay – no expansion for “ship and dip” oysters
  • Critical visual resource protection terms not defined
  • Given sea level rise and Hwy 1 susceptibility to being underwater during the expected lifetime of the LCP, should not be encouraging new commercial operations there
  • We never received updated build-out analysis from County.

 

EAC Working to Protect the Entire Tomales Bay Watershed and Beyond

Despite the number of issues of concern remaining with the LCP Amendment, EAC will remain fully engaged in the public process and beyond. As always, you can count on EAC to ensure protection of the lands, waters, and all resident and migratory inhabitants of the Tomales Bay Watershed and West Marin coastal zone!

Thanks to Planning Commission, and Coastal Commission and County Staff

EAC would like to extend its sincere thanks to you the Marin County Planning Commission and planning staff for their diligent and thorough work the past several months. We would also like to extend our sincere thanks to the California Coastal Commission’s staff for consistently and diligently providing comments on the draft LCP Amendment language.